Top 10 Jamaican Herbs & Spices

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Top Ten: Jamaican Herbs and Spices You MUST Try
 
Cho Cho
Known as chayote, cho cho is technically a fruit, but it’s rather bland on its own. Enjoy it in a savory stew or with a salad.  
 
Breadfruit 
This fleshy, round staple can be enjoyed roasted with meat and vegetable stews or boiled in soups.  
 
Coco 
Coco is a starchy root vegetable like the potato, but with a lighter, creamier flavor similar to powdery yam. The consistency makes it the perfect accompaniment to stews or saucy dishes. 
 
Callaloo 
A staple breakfast green sautéed individually or with salt fish. It’s often paired with green bananas and root vegetables.  
 
Susumber 
Small green berries with a bitter taste, these are enjoyed in stews and soups, and even on their own with breakfast proteins.  
 
Gungo Peas 
A popular variety of pea here in Jamaica, a soup and a variety of the common rice and peas side dish is made exclusively with these beans that are especially beloved during the Christmas holiday season.  
 
Scotch Bonnet Peppers 
Move over habanero and jalapeno; this fiery pepper is only for the brave – but it’s used in everyday Jamaican cooking. Handle with care.  
 
Cerasee 
This bitter bush grows wild in Jamaica and is said to cleanse the blood when had as a tea.  
 
Bizzy  
This is actually a nut that is grated and boiled to make a tea. It’s said to be remedy for a wide variety of ailments, including menstrual cramps, headache, gout, rheumatism, jaundice, nausea, and vomiting. 
 
Cassava 
Used in America to make tapioca, this starchy staple is actually deadly if prepared incorrectly. We use it to make chips in Jamaica.